Fears for vulnerable British woman, 28, who may have been 'duped into sex trade in Pakistan'

  • Leah Reed went missing a week ago
  • Passport last used to enter Pakistan
  • Her parents fear she might be caught in vicious drugs or sex trade

By
Sara Malm

09:26 EST, 8 May 2012

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09:54 EST, 8 May 2012

An international search has been launched today to track down a vulnerable British woman who vanished in Pakistan.

Leah Reed, 28, from Cambridgeshire, told her family she was going on
holiday on April 24.

But when she failed to return and they were unable
to contact her she was reported missing on May 2.

Her passport was used to check on to a flight from Heathrow to Lahore, Pakistan and her parents Leonard Reed and his wife Asta believe, who has bipolar disorder, could have been duped into the sex or drugs trade.

Fear: Leonard Reed pictured with his daughter Leah. He is worried that the 28-year-old may be a victim of sex or drugs trade

Fear: Leonard Reed pictured with his daughter Leah. He is worried that the 28-year-old may be a victim of sex or drugs trade

Mr Reed, a retired teacher with terminal cancer, said he fears she is being used for ‘some sort of marriage arrangement’.

He said: ‘It seems practically certain that our daughter has been targeted, being seen as extremely vulnerable, for some nefarious, as yet unknown purpose.’

Due to Leah’s medical condition the search is time sensitive as she relies on the drug lithium for her bipolar disorder.

Mrs Reed said: ‘I want to say “hang on, you will be found” to Leah because I know she is having a horrible time.’

The former Bassingbourn Village College student, lives with her family in Melbourn, Cambs.

Her worried parents, who have nine children, have been in close contact with police and the British High Commission in Pakistan as they wait for news of their daughter.

Leah Reed is believed to be in Lahore after her passport was used to check in to a flight destined for the Pakistani capital

Leah Reed is believed to be in Lahore after her passport was used to check in to a flight destined for the Pakistani capital

Mrs Reed said: “I have been overwhelmed by the support we have had from people close to us and from the police, which is all helping.

Inspector James Sutherland, from Cambridgeshire Constabulary, said today police do not believe Leah has come to any harm.

He said: ‘I fully understand the genuine concerns that the family have, but we are not jumping to any conclusions.’

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How can this be true of a country that described itself as “the Land of the Pure” in Urdu and Persian on its founding in 1933?

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